Stop the theatrical and get down to the facts!

August 4, 2012
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I was listening today to a program about climate change and it struck me that the doom merchants and naysayers of climate change have each done themselves and their arguments a disservice. The argument has become a black and white “Oh No it isn’t!” “Oh Yes it is” pantomime. The problem being that each group has exaggerated their argument, for whatever reason, from the world ending this afternoon in a large hiss of steam to refusal to recognise that there is any change in climate, and certainly if there is it is more likely to be down to Pixie activity than human pollution. This has served to invalidate the positions of both sides and has stifled genuine open debate amongst scientists and at the same time has driven laypeople to the hills at the very mention of Global warming

The same can be said of the Independence debate:
On the one hand Scotland will sink to the bottom of the Atlantic as England unclips our water wings and leaves us floating alone with several punctures around the area of the Mammores and a fatal leak just north of Berwick. This is scheduled for 3 and half hours after the count of the referendum is complete.
This is countered with Scotland becoming the world’s leading industrial power and every man, woman, child and pet rabbit being showered with gemstones before breakfast on day one of the route to independence.

Clearly there are valid points to be made by both sides, but the extension of claims to the point of farce is doing nothing to engage the populace in serious and worthwhile debate. This is truly a disservice to an extremely important decision making process. The sooner our puffed up leaders stop playing their smartarsed political games and start to present the reality of the situation, the more likely that people will start to engage. It truly is time to put aside the artificial polarisation. Politicians need to recognise that people can see straight through them and do not hold in any real esteem the attempts to treat folk like eejits. The flip side of that is that the political layperson is also able and willing to recognise the genuine case when it is presented and admires the integrity of those that present the facts free from tribalism.


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